Energy Property Credits for 2013

300x200_ideasNon-business energy credits expired in 2011, but were extended (retroactive to 2012) through 2013 by ATRA. For 2013 (as in 2011 and 2012), this credit generally equals 10 percent of what a homeowner spends on eligible energy-saving improvements, up to a maximum tax credit of $500 (down significantly from the $1,500 combined limit that applied for 2009 and 2010).

Because of the way the credit is figured however, in many cases, it may only be helpful to people who made energy-saving home improvements for the first time in 2013.

That’s because homeowners must first subtract any non-business energy property credits claimed on their 2006, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 returns before claiming this credit for 2013. In other words, if a taxpayer claimed a credit of $450 in 2012, the maximum credit that can be claimed in 2013 is $50 (for an aggregate of $500).

The cost of certain high-efficiency heating and air conditioning systems, water heaters and stoves that burn biomass all qualify, along with labor costs for installing these items. In addition, the cost of energy-efficient windows and skylights, energy-efficient doors, qualifying insulation and certain roofs also qualify for the credit, though the cost of installing these items do not.

Gregory J. Cook, EA, CPA

Gregory J. Cook, EA, CPA

News and announcements from Cook & Co. Tax Advisors at 124 South Main Street in Arab, Alabama.
Gregory J. Cook, EA, CPA